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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hye guys just wondering if reloading is worth it i dont shoot a whole lot but now i have to used steel shot because im joining a range. so its goin to be more expensive. how much do you guys usualy spend on a case of steel shot. always wanted to get into it ddint know if it was worth it. also can a re load do all different typs of shells like handguns and rifles with different accessories?
 

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In the long run it's worth it. I bought a Lee progresive from Cabela's to reload .40 cal you can buy the different dies for diff calibers and you can even reload shorter rifle rounds.

Lee also makes a simple shotgun shotshell reloader. In short you'll save money over time and it will become a hobby for you as well.
 

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If you shoot a fair ammount it is worth it. It is a prety cool hobby if you have the time for it. You have to be pretty meticulous about it to do it right and safe.

I bought a dillon reloader years ago when I was shooting rifle and pistol competitions and it was pretty cool. I have thousands of dollars wrapped up in all the stuff you need. Now I just don't have the time to do the reloading. I still have all the stuff and plan to get back into it when I retire.

If you have the money to afford it, I would say start now and stock up on componenets.
 

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you can start reloading pretty inexpensive. I do it mainly because it keeps me in the reloading room, and out of the living room and a whole floor away from the wife.
Your not going to save a whole lot reloading, but its alot of fun.
Unami is correct you have to be pretty meticulous, after all your making explosives, you want to watch your recipes.
 

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It's worth it if you shoot enough. But I don't think it offers the cost savings that it used to anymore since component costs have skyrocketed. For me I get pleasure out of it more than anything else, and you just need to set aside some time to do it. Tuning loads to make your centerfire arm the most accurate can be pretty rewarding.
You are also describing two disciplines here; shotshell reloading for shotgun with steel shot (which requires some different equipment than reloading with lead shot) and metallic cartridge reloading for rifle and pistol. All require their own specialized equipment and the suggestions offered here are all good ones. You will, over time, amass quite a bit of equipment if you get into it. The best part is you get so much, and if you have a room to put it in, no one ever wants to go in there and bother you! Except my three kids, who reload shotshells regularly for me. So, read up as much as you can about the subject and see if it's for you.
 

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With the lack of availability of reasonably priced pistol ammo lately I wish I had closed the deal I had working for a reloading press a few years ago. Some guy was selling an semi-automated pistol ammo reloading equipment at the ANJRPC swap meet. I balked on the deal because I didn't know if I was getting a good deal. That was a mistake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
well are there any good starter kits out there for the 9mm or the shotshell? somehting that wont cost a arm and a leg
 

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shotgun, go with a Mec, whatever you can afford. Rifle n Pistol stick with RCBS, I think both of these are more user friendly than Lee.
 

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I reload for .44 Mag,with a Lee 1000 progressive. By my figures it takes about 500-700 rounds to start paying for itself. Almost there.

I have reloaded .308 in the past with a single-stage press, which pays back in fewer rounds, but how many .308 do you shoot?

Shotgunning equipment is entirely different and specialized. No experience.
 

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Ditto on Whiskers recommendation: MEC for shotshell because of price and value for dollar, RCBS at least to start out with in metallic and Unami's choice of Dillon if you are going to reload in quantity.

My Dad is 84 and no longer reloads. (He relies on me now for his hunting loads). He got rid of his MEC last year and it had conversion kits for three gauges (12,16,20). He's used it since 1962. It still worked fine, which I guess is a testimony to its quality and maybe too that American's can still build stuff that lasts.
 

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I would like someone too reload 6.5 x 55 mm swedish mauser bullets for me. Seems my gun made in 1919,cip pressure is not rated to handle modren loads. A store bought round exerts 56,000 lbs of cup pressure my gun is rated for 53,000 lbs.
 

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I reload for .45 acp, .38 special and .41 mag with a Dillon 550B. The cost of good .45 target loads is expensive and .41 mags are rediculously expensive. So with that in mind, it pays for me...if you can find dang primers!
 

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I love reloading as much as shooting/.. It really adds to the thrill of the hunt when you work up your own loads and then use them successfully. Same high when you work up a load that gives you 3 shots under a dime.. I have used all kinds of loading tools and love my Lee dies and press. You don't need to spend a ton of money to get great results. Check out the Lee classic turret press. I gave away my other presses(rcbs & lyman) and use it exclusively now. With mail orders like midwayusa and midsouthshooterssupply.com you can get stuff affordable now.
 

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If you need to reload steel the savings is small. The componants are pricy for steel, balistic products and precision reloading are two companys I have been dealing with for about 10 years. If you don't shoot a lot of steel, Mack's praire wings has the best deals on steel shot I think they are the number one dealer for winchester in the USA (mackspw.com)
 

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I reload for the fun of it and pride in reloading my own bullets. Good way to spend some time being very detail oriented.

I bought an RCBS kit. I then bought the dies online. RCBS dies have a lifetime warranty. Easy to do if you follow any reloading manual. Like most things, there are tricks of the trade and tools to make it easier/quicker. Start simple and work your way up if you so desire.
 

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I'm new to Reloading and looking for guidance thanks in advance guys... any recommendations on where to purchase powders, dies, press etc?
 
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