New Jersey Hunters banner

21 - 37 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,616 Posts
Another Baker victim here. Slid down from 20 feet also, thank God I was young! Another time the bottom part slid down to the bottom of the tree and I was sitting 18 feet up on the seat. Did my best bear hug down the tree to the bottom. No safety belts back then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,374 Posts
Go to the WMA and climb some trees... get used to setting up and tearing the stand down, quietly. Get used to your climbing harness and working your safety gear. Get used to utilizing a haul line to lift items off the ground. Get used to setting the angles on the stand, so when you're 15-25ft up you're level. Get used to finding good hunting trees that are climber friendly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
I hunt about 90% out of a climber. I use a rope style tree strap to tie off to the tree as I climb. Definitely need to make sure top and bottom are tied together. Stick to trees that look like a telephone pole until you get used to it....then you can move on to knotty trees or trees with a lot of flare at the bottom.

The funny thing is: I feel safer in a climber than I do in a hang on with sticks. I use a TreeWalker climber. You might want to check that out...its absolutely rock solid on the tree. I'm sure the Summit is fine as well...it's a very popular stand. As others have said, practice in the day time a few times and stick to straight trees without a lot of big knots until you are comfortable.

One other thing to be aware of...when you're setting up the climber at the base of the tree you need to make sure it's angled up. As you climb, the diameter of the tree gets smaller and the angle will decrease. If you misjudge, don't climb past the point where your seat and platform are parallel to the ground. You'll get better at judging this as you go along. I try to set the platform high (like above my shoulders) as it gets easier to judge once you get past the "flare" at the base of the tree. Then, I pull it down to where I can climb in. If the tree has significant flare at the bottom you're angle can be pretty severe to start. I carry a screw in step with me that I use in case its too steep to climb in on the ground level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
As a new hunter (experienced too!) you may want to start out with a good ground blind. Black inside to hide movement, and 2 man size to allow room for gear. Easy to transport and change location. Just use a comfortable seat. They keep out rain too. If you are on public ground, don't leave anything or it will get stolen. Even private ground is iffy. I also had a Baker, as some others here. What a POS. They all belong in the trash. Good hunting.
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,514 Posts
I hunt about 90% out of a climber. I use a rope style tree strap to tie off to the tree as I climb. Definitely need to make sure top and bottom are tied together. Stick to trees that look like a telephone pole until you get used to it....then you can move on to knotty trees or trees with a lot of flare at the bottom.

The funny thing is: I feel safer in a climber than I do in a hang on with sticks. I use a TreeWalker climber. You might want to check that out...its absolutely rock solid on the tree. I'm sure the Summit is fine as well...it's a very popular stand. As others have said, practice in the day time a few times and stick to straight trees without a lot of big knots until you are comfortable.

One other thing to be aware of...when you're setting up the climber at the base of the tree you need to make sure it's angled up. As you climb, the diameter of the tree gets smaller and the angle will decrease. If you misjudge, don't climb past the point where your seat and platform are parallel to the ground. You'll get better at judging this as you go along. I try to set the platform high (like above my shoulders) as it gets easier to judge once you get past the "flare" at the base of the tree. Then, I pull it down to where I can climb in. If the tree has significant flare at the bottom you're angle can be pretty severe to start. I carry a screw in step with me that I use in case its too steep to climb in on the ground level.
Great advice. Just practice and take it slow at first and use a harness. You'll be fine.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
It's not just about my first time :D I still have a death grip when I put the stands up and am usually sweating by the time I'm done no matter how cold it is out. I hate heights with all burning passion. Moreover, my tree stand is not very reliable thing. I wish I had Lone Wolf. I'm examining the market now, read reviews https://bestoutdooritems.com/best-climbing-tree-stands/ , forum topics like this, cause I want a long-lasting and reliable item.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
I have the same summit tree stand. I would strongly recommend getting a set of third hand archery stabilizer straps to tie the upper and lower halves of the stand together while climbing and also to cinch the top half down tightly once you have reached the desired height. They also work well to keep the stand from jiggling and making a bunch of noise while it's on your back. As others have said, the molle straps and summit bags make nice upgrades as well.
Whatever you do, don't lean over the side of the stand. It will move and you will crap yourself at the very least

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,162 Posts
If your going to use a climber, practice, practice. pratice.
 
21 - 37 of 37 Posts
Top