New Jersey Hunters banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Common Watersnakes, as the name implies, are very abundant in N.J. In the water they look black but when dry they have a pretty cool pattern to them, as you can see from the snake at the bottom of the photo. I once saw one that had a lot of color to it and looked more like a copperhead, which we also have in Jersey. When you try to catch them they are very aggresive and can give a nasty bite. They will also eject a foul smelling liquid from there tail end. I once saw one stuck in an empty killie trap. When I opened the trap to release it he regurgitated about a dozen killies then slid back into the water. I think they do this if confronted right after a meal in order to "lighten" the load.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,369 Posts
[eek][up]awesome. reminds me when i was on the canal fishin in a canoe and a copperhead swims right past us...that was scary as hell
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,797 Posts
awesome. reminds me when i was on the canal fishin in a canoe and a copperhead swims right past us...that was scary as hell
My Ex was from Alabama. She HATED snakes...ever since a copperhead dropped off a tree limb into her canoe in girl scout camp...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,369 Posts
almost 90% sure...he was within 3 feet of the boat..its patterns looked like a copperhead's..along with his head looking copper colored and it also having a different shaped head..looked triangular lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,228 Posts
I'll never forget watching a 6ft+ copperhead swimming towards me and my younger brother when we're fishing at Furnace Lake back when we were little and what does he do? Try to catch with his shiner and it was going right for it! He was 8 or so at the time and had no idea what he was doing so I grabbed him and pulled him back off the dock we were fishing. That would've been a crazy sight if he had hooked it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,355 Posts
Once on the Flatbrook just across from the rifle range I had a snake swim through my legs while fishing.

Also once on the Deleware saw one of those northern watersnakes in the process of ingesting a small fish( the size of a fathead). Half the fish was outside his mouth.

Telefante or 870 can correct me if I am wrong but it is my observation that with the exception of cottenmouths (that don't live in this latatude) venemous snakes tend to avoid water. So a snake you see swimming is harmless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,810 Posts
Do these snakes bite?
If you go to touch them they will bite you. Long....curved back....needle sharp teeth too. They will also defend their territory at times and come for you out of the blue.

venemous snakes tend to avoid water. So a snake you see swimming is harmless.
I would advise against using this as a sure fire determination of non-venomous status. I have seen copperheads swim and there was a youtube on here a month back of a 6 foot eastern diamondback rattlesnake swimming.... [eek]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,355 Posts
Quote:
venemous snakes tend to avoid water. So a snake you see swimming is harmless.
I would advise against using this as a sure fire determination of non-venomous status. I have seen copperheads swim and there was a youtube on here a month back of a 6 foot eastern diamondback rattlesnake swimming....
Quote:
So a snake you see swimming is harmless.

The majority of “copperhead” encounters are in and around water. More often than not it’s a watersnake and not a copperhead.
Another myth I had been adhering to debunked.

I saw a cottenmouth once on the Chatahotchee River. (the Ga/Al border.) That thing was creepy swimming with his mouth open. It came pretty close to the boat I was in. I was thinking about clubbing it with an oar.

Another questions for our snake experts. Is a cottenmouth and a water moccasin the same snake?
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top