New Jersey Hunters banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking about getting started in Traditional Archery. Mystic I know you are into maybe one day we can get together and we can go over what is needed and how to do it. I use to shoot a recurve and was really good with it. It has been ten years since I have shot one and I am getting the urge to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,928 Posts
Sean, you dont need much.

A stick, a string, a set of matched arrows, a leather shooting tab (or glove), some puff silencers, a bow-stringer, some cut on contact broadheads, and a lot of time to practice. (Maybe that is a lot of stuff? LOL)

Matching bow length to draw lentgth is important for accuracy and to prevent finger pinch. If you have about a 28" draw, you will be good with a 58"-60" recurve. Also, matching arrow spine to the bow is vital. You cant tune centershot on an arrow being shot off the shelf, so you need the right spine arrows to begin with. I suggest bare-shaft tuning with different size arrows till you find the right size.

Also, the form used for recurves is slightly different than what you use with a compound. I saw a vast improvement in accuracy (with the recurve) when someone taught me to keep my wrist straight (extended, high wrist position). I was also told to grip the bow, rather than loosely hold it like a compound.

The most important thing of all is the time though, you will need TIME. Shooting instinctively (well) with a recurve or longbow takes practice.

Im sure some of the others who have been around trad longer will have some more tips, but thats what Ive learned while fiddling around with my recurve, and reading up on trad archery.

Good luck![up]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Matty, And the 4 of us have to get back out again one day I had a good time.[up]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,010 Posts
Sean, what about a 5th? I wasn't able to make it that day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
sure mike we can do that
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,011 Posts
Sean, Matty is right on alott of stuff. But a recurve is very close to a compound. So you wont lose that much in your draw length. It also depends on the kind of Trad bow you get. Take the gamemaster, you can move the rest to find tune your bow better then I can on my long bow. I shoot off the shelf and my long bow is NOT CUT TO CENTER. The trad bow shop I goto is in Washington, NJ and the own there is great.

I don't bareshaft my arrows, I use this CHART. I tryed the bareshaft test and got the arrows set and after fletching the arrows came out a little stiff. I now shot 29" - 30" shafts ( Easton & Cedars )

I really like a nice 2-blade COC BH, Leftwing banana feathers. My Trad guy can set you up. Then you can get someone else to make your arrows or you can do it.

Matty, talked about length of a bow to draw length

If you have about a 28" draw, you will be good with a 58"-60" recurve.
I would go with 60" or more, My draw with my long bow is 26" on a recurve it's 28" about the same as my compound.

Recurves You will find out that they can take more spined arrows then a long bow. ( Say you have a 28" draw 55# bow you could use: 2018, 2020 or 2117 shafts cut from 29" to 31" ) trad shooters shot longer shaft arrows ( atleast the ones I know ).


BECAREFUL YOU MAY NOT EVER GO BACK TO A COMPOUND AFTER AGAIN
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Mystic, Thanks for the info. I may have to get together with you and check this out. Only problem I just bought a new compound this year and if I get hooked I will have to sell it. Naa! I was looking for a traditional bow for stalking hunts, I like getting in the woods and trying to stalk the Deer nice slow walk ghillie suit you know the excitement of you catching them and walkingup on them instead of them walking up on you. I love the stalk.

Do you watch the Easton bow hunting show on TOC guys name is Fred Eigler (SP)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,928 Posts
Mystic, it doesnt sound like you bareshaft tuned correctly. [confused]

You should have one fletched arrow and one bareshaft, with some small pieces of tape to compensate for the missing fletching weight.

Then you shoot them together, and find the spine arrow shaft that impacts closest with its fletched version. This gives you the best flying shaft for your setup. It is expensive though, because you have to buy two shafts in the different spines you want to try. BUT it will make for one sweet shooting bow.

I wouldnt even take into consideration your compound draw length Sean. Ive seen that you shoot a release and anchor pretty far back. With a recurve you will be anchoring somewhere near your lip or eye most likely and using fingers, so just measure for it with a lightweight recurve.

Mystic is right about going with a longer tip to tip bow, they are more forgiving, but at shorter draw lengths, you really can get away with a shorter bow without sacrificing forgivness and thereby gaining speed.

Make sure to shoot the recurve before you buy it too. Some stack (pick up weight) quickly near your draw length. This occurs more with longbows, but it happens with recurves as well. This makes the bow harder to draw and shoot accurately.

Also, by playing with string twist, you can adjust the fistmele, (brace height) of the bow. Twist or untwist till the bow is most comfortable for you. {Higher brace height is more forgiving)

The chart that mystic provided looks to be a very good starting point for finding the right arrows for your setup. Pick the two closest shaft sizes there and try them out.

By the way, are you thinking of going with a modern recurve like the Hoyt Gamesport, or a traditional wooden riser like the Martin dream catcher?

Most of the modern ones with aluminum risers are cut to center, and do have rest mounting holes so you can play with the centershot. Whereas the wooden recurves I was talking about cant be cut to true center, and the only way to play with center shot, is to add or subtract a layer of fleece on the back of the shelf.

Remember when setting up a bow shot with fingers, you want the arrow out from the riser, not in line with the string (centershot) like a release bow. (when sighting down the string and aligning it with the limb tips, your arrow tip should stick out just enough to see most of it) This accomodates for archers paradox, the sideways bending of a finger released arrow. Also the nocking point needs to be above 90 degrees,(unlike a release setup) it should be more like 1/8" high. (of course the perfect setting will be found when tuning.)

I think the hardest thing for anyone trying to get into trad archery is finding a bow they can shoot before they buy. I dont know of any places that carry recurves in stock.:( That will be your biggest stumbling block. Maybe you can find some guys that have trad equip. and ask if you can try it to get a feel for what you like in a recurve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Matty that is allot of helpful info. When I am ready we will need to get together. Hey today is a good day to work on that rest you got over there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,928 Posts
yeah, its on my brothers bow, and ready to go. I just have to pick up some arrows for it.[up]

So far I like the fact that its very easy to set up and adjust![up]
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,011 Posts
Mystic, it doesnt sound like you bareshaft tuned correctly
I did it the same way Byron does in his book " Become the arrow" The arrows I have now wasn't bareshaft tested, and when I paper tuned they hit like bullets and fly like darts.

AT stick & string you can try any bow he has in stock. New or used. I agree with Matty that you have to try as many bows as you can before buying any bow. A bow for my could be the worst bow for you.


I wouldnt even take into consideration your compound draw length Sean. Ive seen that you shoot a release and anchor pretty far back. With a recurve you will be anchoring somewhere near your lip or eye most likely and using fingers
True, but is it still closer then a long bow would be...

By the way, are you thinking of going with a modern recurve like the Hoyt Gamesport, or a traditional wooden riser like the Martin dream catcher?
PSE makes some wooden T/D recurves with rest holes in them so does Martin.

I would also go with a lighter bow, I used to shoot a 65# compound and found that if I droped 12#'s of draw weight it felt good to shoot. If I was you I would get a 40 -45# recurve to start off with. Don't brake the bank on your first Trad bow after a year or so Then go out a pay $500.00+ for a good Bow.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top