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I went hunting near my upstate house the other night for foxs and coyotes. It was my first time, I was very freaked. Saw what looked like coyotes, walkin around me. I didnt have a light so I got the hell outa there [hihi]. Anyone give me some advice, when and how to get them ?
 

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OK...you need a very good light or know how to work a white light!

When using a white light...you want to do 2 things, and then 1 final thing.
1st...keep the light moving.
2nd...use the lower 1/3 of the light to actually scan the area.
and finally...once you locate the 'eyes' never take the light off of them.

I use a cheap lantern type flashlight and I put red tail-light tape on the lens. Its not very bright, but it will pick up the 'eyes' from long ways. I test it on my dog at night. :)

And...yes...it is a bit scary the first couple of times you are out there alone. It's a cool and eerie feeling.
 

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I am trying to get a Coyote Seminar going from the NJF& Biologist and from Andrew Lewand.

The seminar will be held in Bridgewater or Branchburg.

See Andrew’s Bio below.

Here is one of his books : http://www.amazon.com/Eastern-Coyote-Challenge-Complete-Calling/dp/1448602866/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_2



Andrew L Lewand Biography

As a student at SUNY Cobleskill majoring in Fisheries & Wildlife Technology, Andrew Lewand began to intensely study the eastern coyote and it's biology. He then applied his hunting knowledge to the information he had learned and the result was a highly effective system of how to hunt the coyote. Many years later, Lewand still enjoys pursuing the coyote and has formed The Bark at the Moon Coyote Club as a way to share the thrill of predator hunting.
Andrew Lewand has been fascinated with the eastern coyote after being introduced to the predator in the early 1980's. Those initial outings to monitor coyote denning sites truly enhanced his desire to learn all that he could about the curious canine. It was out west, however, where Andrew gained his first true experience of hunting the coyote. Frequent hunting trips to Colorado and South Dakota provided excellent opportunity to develop strategies to successfully call in coyotes.
After graduating college, Andrew was thrilled to see the coyote take hold in many of the areas that he hunted for other game species, such as woodchucks, squirrels and deer. Ever since the early eighties, Andrew has persued coyotes (as well as fox) and lists predator hunting as his main interest. Indeed, it is this passion with the coyote that lead Andrew to found the Bark At The Moon Coyote Club. The "Club" has expanded rapidly in the past few years and has allowed Andrew to make great friendships with fellow hunters and hunting industry leaders. The future of the club, and all of it's undertakings, is exciting and Andrew is always striving to provide more services/events for predator hunters.
Andrew's intense interest in predator hunting led him to become a highly respected speaker on various topics of predator hunting. His multi-media seminars inform and entertain audiences across the northeast. Lewand is also a free lance writer and his articles can be seen in hunting magazines such as The Varmint Hunter Magazine, NBS Outdoor and Predator Xtreme.
 

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I have been hunting the coyote and fox at nite for the last 3 seasons. COYOTES ARE NOT EASY. In that time i have realized it isnt easy to bring a coyote into shooting distance alone. It seems to me to have a second person to help with the calling and the lite while you focus on how far the shot is and if its worth taking because you dont want to wound him and never have the chance again to shoot or even see him again. Fox on the other hand seem to be more relaxed and willing to commit and inspect more when being called and that you can do it alone. BUT again IMO I feel its always better with that secaond person to help. because when they do come into shoot distance your heart starts pumping FOX FEVER and you could F it UP and drop your lite call hat gloves whatever and blow your chance.[wallmad] so my advice would be get afew of the main items like a Elusive Wildlife RED KILL LITE 250 if your hunting fields of 100 KILL LITE if your hunting the woods.IMO the 250 is to strong and gives to much glare off every branch in the woods, afew distressed cottontail calls try them out and see which you like best,a electronic caller if you have the means get one with good long distance sound,good cover sent,good seat,howler,coyote pup distress,wind detector and a small mouse squeeky(key item)rite there[up]. batteries, T shot and a good choke for those long shots. and than its all practice and learn as you go. Lots of Luck be smart and safe hope this helps out for next time. happy hunting:)
 

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hey bird, not sure of the NY laws BUT I would hunt with anything bigger then a 22cal. Im not saying you can take a coyote with a 22cal but ur chance's are slim IT being your first few times out IMO. I would use a shotgun for nite time hunting, and for hunting thick brush during the day, if thats when your planning to hunt. If you choice the day and its legal go with the rifle with a good BI-POD for a steddy rest in the fields. NJ you can't use a rifle for fox or coyote. Maybe one day they will change that law
 
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