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Fawns are best! But some so called "hunters" like raidertaker think it isn't ethical or right to shoot a cute little fawn "must be anti's" haha. I'm not one of them! A dead deer is a dead deer but the smaller ones taste so much better!
 

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I firmly believe that every deer no amtter age or weight has the ability to taste excellent but it has everything to do with the care given to the meat once the fatal shot enters the animal.
shot placement is key. You don't want stomach digestive juice or bile flowing over your meat and tainting it. Tarsals on big ruttin buck have to be removed ASAP. Bleeding a deer if not already accomplished with the shot is also important but rarely done.
Proper and prompt field dressing is also very important.
aging the meat for a minimum of 2 days temperature permitting of course. 35-45 being optimal imo.

I'm positive this is all stuff that you know already but I see the difference when proper steps are taking from the field to the table. Treat the deer like a 280lb big eye and you'll be eating sashimi, treat the deer like a blue fish and........... you know what I mean.
 

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I don't think anyone will shoot a deer in NJ that is too old to eat. I hear people say this size/sex deer is better than others. I can't tell if you cook it properly.
 

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I firmly believe that every deer no amtter age or weight has the ability to taste excellent but it has everything to do with the care given to the meat once the fatal shot enters the animal.
shot placement is key. You don't want stomach digestive juice or bile flowing over your meat and tainting it. Tarsals on big ruttin buck have to be removed ASAP. Bleeding a deer if not already accomplished with the shot is also important but rarely done.
Proper and prompt field dressing is also very important.
aging the meat for a minimum of 2 days temperature permitting of course. 35-45 being optimal imo.

I'm positive this is all stuff that you know already but I see the difference when proper steps are taking from the field to the table. Treat the deer like a 280lb big eye and you'll be eating sashimi, treat the deer like a blue fish and........... you know what I mean.
X2 def all in the care after harvest, and also in prep before its cooked. If venison sits in its blood in a package defrosting its not worth feeding to the dog.
 

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I am another that agrees with Anthony, while taste may vary slightly from individuals the hunter has far more to do with how things taste.
A clean kill, no time wasted in getting the animal gutted cooled down and drained and continued care and respect given thru the whole process goes a long way to having quality meat that will give a good cook a fighting chance at producing a meal worthy of ANY table.
 

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I believe yearling Deer are the most tender.Once they get past yearly age they all taste somewhat the same to me. I believe It has more to do with there diet than there age.
 

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to justify killing babies
Why is this not an issue when we go out to eat and say "Hey Mario hows the veal today?" the average chicken meets Col. Sanders @ 6 weeks of age porkchops happen @ 210 days.
OH and it always seems to me it's the guy who has no poblem shooting 1.5 y.o. 6 point bucks that says this.

I almost want to say (and can almost get myself to beleive it) shoot what you will use or give to others in good shape and be happy don't judge others.
 

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ive found that properly taking out all of the connective tissue constitutes a better tasting piece of meat... after proper field care has taken place of course.
 
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