New Jersey Hunters banner

1 - 20 of 97 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
791 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I don't plan on taking any spikes at all this year. I really want to see some of these baby boys grow up to be mature bucks. Any body plan on doing the same?
 
B

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I hunt public lands, so I doubt I would p [no swearing please] on a spike, unless I see a bigger buck in the distance. Shotgun season I will take the spike, no questions asked
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,928 Posts
Spikes, fours, almost all six pointers and even some eight points are safe around me. This year alone Ive already passed on about 4 different bucks (after I got my bank a doe).


It HAS to be a wall hanger for me to consider shooting it.

I love to hear when others think the same way! When you think about it, if you let him walk, theres only one thing a small buck can do, and thats GROW BIGGER![up][up]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,283 Posts
For the most part the areas I hunt are QDM Zones so the spikes etc have to walk. Even if they weren't QDM Zones, I wouldn't shoot anything less than a very large 6 or nice 8 pt.
I've already passed up bucks that met the QDM requirements this year. They just weren't big enough.
Like the poster said, they can only grow bigger (or get hit by a car).:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,574 Posts
I passed on a tall 4 last night, so no, I won't shoot spikes either. Most of the guys in the club I hunt let the little ones walk, hopefully the guys around us also.

-dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
Zone 16 for me - buck must have at least three points on one side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,954 Posts
I think it would depend on the situation. Are there other deer with it, does that is. I would take a doe over a spike. But if all I saw that day is that one and only spike, I'd probably take it.

Of course, as always, chaos and pandomonium would follow here on this site. :D

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,564 Posts
End up on JerseyJim's dinner table!!! Send them my way
lol, i'm more of a meat hunter than trophy hunter. of course i'ld love to get a huge buck but i love the meat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,448 Posts
Up until about 2 years ago I would shoot anything with horns. Now I have alot more time to be in the woods so I won't shoot a small rack buck.
I know guys that are buck hunters. Any buck will do. They would rather shoot an 80lb spike than a 100 lb doe. I"ll take the doe.
I let about 8 - 10 small bucks walk by me this year before I shot my split brow 7 pointer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,462 Posts
Posted: 21 Oct 2005 5:08 AM

Moderator
Currently Offline Posts: 1222
Join Date: Feb 2005
Spikes, fours, almost all six pointers and even some eight points are safe around me. This year alone Ive already passed on about 4 different bucks (after I got my bank a doe).

me too


It HAS to be a wall hanger for me to consider shooting it.

I love to hear when others think the same way! When you think about it, if you let him walk, theres only one thing a small buck can do, and thats GROW BIGGER!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,035 Posts
I try to stick to something I would put on the wall. Have shot allot of smaller deer over the years and pretty much tried to shoot older deer- hardest deer to p [no swearing please] up is a 2 1/2 year 8 - they look great - but need one more year
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,117 Posts
BowhunterCop - I've been hunting zone 4 for the past 23 years, all public hunting grounds. I used to take spikes and forkers, but over the last 5 -6 years, i've been letting them walk. I let many spikes, fork horns and small 4 pointers pass. Last year I was rewarded with a 145lb 8 pointer, 16.5 outside spread. The biggest i've every taken and also ever had withing shooting distance. I'm telling you, practice your own QDM. Take a nice doe for the freezer, but let the small bucks pass. I have been seeing more bucks and some alot bigger, more six's and eight's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,928 Posts
Call me what you will, but I NEVER will understand the hunter willing to shoot a small buck over a doe.
[confused][confused][confused]



Show me a hunter that wouldn't like to see bigger bucks roaming their local woodlots. I dont think theres a hunter out there that doesnt want to see bigger bucks. Unfortunately, many think they are something exclusive to Kansas and Nebraska, well that doesn't have to be the case. No matter what state your favorite hunting grounds are in, you can have bigger bucks.


So how do we grow these big bucks without work? Well it’s simple really, except we aren't growing them, mother nature still does that part. We as hunters simply give her more time to do so. To do this, we as hunters have to alter our attitudes towards what we consider a successful hunting career.


For years it has been said that Northeastern states and Southern states can't grow "the big ones". While most states don't offer the nutrients that the Midwest farm-lands do; they are still capable of growing larger deer than they do now. Hunters simply have to let the bucks grow or reach or near reaching their maximum potential. To do this, we have to p [no swearing please] them as young six pointers, and basket rack eight pointers. While these small sixes and eights are tempting to even some seasoned hunters; most are only yearling bucks, sporting their first set of "real" antlers. Their bodies are still growing, robbing nutrients from potential antler growth. Because of this, they haven't yet reached half of their antler growth potential. Take that 2.5 year old eight point hanging on your wall for example; Give him another year of growth, and he will add enough mass, and antler growth to nearly double his 1.5 year old headgear.


So do you want bigger bucks? I do. Let’s go grow 'em....err...let 'em go, so they can grow!
Wait a minute though. If I p [no swearing please] that little six or eight pointer, won’t someone else shoot him? They might, but they might not; if you shoot him though, I can guarantee he won't grow. This is where the "work" comes in. What? You didn't actually believe that you didn't have to do anything, did you? Well you don't have to do much, you just have to help other hunters see the benefits of passing young bucks, and convince them to do just that. As simple as that sounds, it may be harder than putting a tag on the biggest buck of your life. People may understand the benefits, but aren't likely to embrace the idea without the guarantee that everyone will be going by these "rules".


Lead by example. Explain to all the hunters in your area that you’re going to be passing all the young bucks you encounter. Ask them if they would be willing to do the same. Agree upon an approximate age, or size, buck you are willing to harvest. If you hunt in a club, or private land, make a rule stating any buck you take must be mounted; or must have a certain antler spread and number of points. If you hunt public land, approach hunters in the parking areas, striking up a conversation about the potential of some of the bucks you've seen. Tell them about the young bucks you have seen and passed. Encourage them to do the same. Talk about how big those same bucks will be next year.


The bucks in my area aren't very big to begin with. How much bigger are they really going to get in one or two years? Well, to answer that, A LOT. During a buck's first two years of life, most of his "energy" goes into body (muscular and skeletal) growth. Therefore his antlers don't receive much of the nutrition he's taking in. Simply growing off the excess nutrients. With every passing year of life, he nears his maximum body growth potential; allowing more and more nutrients to reach his headgear. Finally around his fifth year of life, he reaches maximum muscular and skeletal potential. At this age he can begin to devote most of his food intake to antler growth. I'm not asking you to wait for their fourth or fifth year of life though. Second and third year bucks are considerably larger than yearling bucks. Unless you’re on a larger tract of private property, its probably best not to push for the passing of 3.5 or 4.5 year old bucks. Other hunters will think your crazy, and forget about the whole idea. Stick with passing 1.5 and some 2.5 year old bucks and you will see a vast improvement.


How can we tell if a buck is growing small antlers because he lacks the right genes, and not due to age? Chances are you will never see a buck old enough to have reached his potential. Even the smallest spikes and "fork-horns" can have the potential to grow into record book bucks. Yet often times they are "culled" from the herd, mistakenly labeled scrub, or management bucks. This isn't the case however. These deer are often your typical yearling buck, and though they may lack the antler potential of an eight point yearling buck. Given time, they still possess the ability to grow a much larger rack. A true "management" buck is one that has reached full body growth potential, yet still lacks the amount of tines, or m [no swearing please] that is typical of the area. The chances of ever seeing one of these bucks on public hunting lands, is about the same as spotting a Sasquatch. Not very good. So don't shoot the small bucks, or the bucks with scraggly racks. Give them another year or two; you probably won’t recognize them with the added "potential".


My neighbor says he hunts for meat, and needs to fill his freezer! How will this plan affect him? Well, I don't want to deny anyone the right to collect meat! So if he's honestly in need of sustenance, by all means, tell him to take the first legal deer he deems fit. Your efforts and the efforts of others around you can make up for his needs. However, ask him if he's honestly in need of meat. Recreational hunters sometimes confuse "wanting" and "needing" meat. Wanting meat is fine, it should remain one of the primary reasons you hunt, but filling your freezer can be done by shooting does. You don't have to shoot the first legal deer you see if you simply "want" venison. Hold out for a mature doe, or mature buck, filling more of the vacancy in your freezer. Also by holding out for the mature deer, the remaining deer and wildlife will reap the benefits. If he or she truly is in need of meat though, offer them the chance to take what they need. Also offer them any unneeded venison you may have. These generous gestures may afford them the opportunity to p [no swearing please] some of the smaller bucks. Helping you to reach your goals much quicker.


So what should you pass, and how do you know your passing the right deer? Well, you want to p [no swearing please] the younger bucks, letting them go, so they can grow. You can estimate the age of a buck by the following; Young, immature bucks will look like does with antlers. Having a slender build, long-legs and big "doe" eyes. Their antlers often consist of small basket racks, ranging from spikes to eight points. You want to p [no swearing please] those deer. As the deer matures, he will begin to look more muscular. The deer you're looking to harvest can be compared to "bulls with antlers". They are blocky, well-built, breeding machines. Any buck 3.5 years old and older will start to take on this look. As bucks continue to mature reaching 5.5 years old and older; they will have even larger bodies, "fuller" looking bellies, and a much more noticeable sloping or sagging back. Their faces are often grizzled, more graying around the eyes, nose, mouth and ears. Their faces are often times much larger than a younger deer. They will also normally have a stiffer gait, almost arthritic looking. Finally, 9 times out of 10, you can tell the difference by the wider, taller, massive antlers they grow. So, don't worry, you will KNOW when you see the right one.


We aren't done yet, there's one last thing you can do to help the wildlife in your area! Shoot some does. While it’s best to talk with a biologist on just how many does you should take. In most regions you can simply take one or two mature does per year. This opens up a "vacancy" in the forage that other deer can "fill". Allowing the remaining deer to get just a bit more nutrition from the local browse. If you're unsure about how many to take, consult a local biologist, or your States division of wildlife. If does aren't legal for harvest in your area, ask why.
Well, you've sat here long enough reading this. Go scouting already; the big ones you're gonna "grow" aren't push-overs!
To learn more about producing quality deer in your hunting woods.

Click here to visit the QDMA website.

The above picture is property of Brian Anderson and was published here with his permission.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,435 Posts
Slobgun hunters wipe them out!

I have passed so many small bucks in hopes of seeing them mature into a nice buck to no avail. there just isnt enough people that want to p [no swearing please] them. I took a deer to a butcher one time and when he saw this average 8 pt buck I had he said wow that is a really nice buck. I couldnt understand what he ment until he opened the freezer and all I saw was little 3 inch spikes and tiny 3 point bucks and even a bunch of fawns etc....He said " These #&^%$# will shoot anything, yours is the nicest buck I have seen all season." that was when it sunk in for me that all the deer I p [no swearing please] just get blown away anyway so what is the point. Yes I still p [no swearing please] bucks, but I don't kid myself into thinking they will live past Slobgun season anymore[sad]
 
1 - 20 of 97 Posts
Top