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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just getting started reloading and noticed different manuals have drastically different starting and max loads for the same powder bullet combos. Looking at the lever action 45/70 loads (not trapdoor or ruger)some books starting loads are hotter then others max loads. Anyone have any thoughts on this?
 

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Looking at the lever action 45/70 loads (not trapdoor or ruger)some books starting loads are hotter then others max loads. Anyone have any thoughts on this?
I'm kind of surprised at that, what manuals are you looking at? Try a reliable source like Nosler and you shouldn't have any problems
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have the Lee modern reloading and one of the books from cabelas thats just 45-70 data. Also looking at the hodgdon data online they all seem to be all over the place.
 

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You will find differences, some reasons may be type of rifle used to test the loads, other reasons is manufactures just want to be safe so they state a little lower, If you really wanna see some differences look at older reloading manuals. I have books from 15 years ago with much hotter loads then whats being produced in todays manuals

Just remember to start below the max load, and work your way up. look for signs of excessive pressure as you increase you powder amounts.
 

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Many loading manuals, some thirty years old to more modern publications, will be all over the board. Some disparities have to do with how pressures were measured then with how pressures are measured today. Measuring the crush on a copper pellet compared to the more modern method of using a piezo transducer is why older manuals may be higher in pressure numbers than modern ones. Powder development and formulation of new ones have also changed many recipes. The single thing to remember is the safe load pressure your rifle (lever action Marlin) is designed to handle and operate with safely. Make note of how to look for pressures signs too; hard extraction, brass flow, blown primers, flattened primers, etc.

The Marlin is designed to safely handle pressures up to 43.000 PSI. Use that as the rule of thumb for the utmost max. when you reload and you should be fine. There is no need to go there though, for your shoulder will give out long before the gun does. Just make note that some load manuals list PSI, while others use CUP (copper units of pressure.) If you look at the Hodgdon .45-70 Govt. load data for lever actions that's online, most loads don't exceed 38,000-psi or 40,000 CUP.
 
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