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I read about this organization in the paper..[up][up]

I have 2 small kids in the house. I have a safe. These locks work just as good in protecting them.
 

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great idea,especially when kids are around.hey don,t you wish they sold something like this that could lock the wifes or girfriends mouth shut so she could not fire nasty comments about your hunting.lol:D:D:D
 
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buckfever, we can make millions $$$$$$$$$$:D:p[up], I'm going to drawing board right now
 

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I have trigger locks on all of my guns, a safe with a combination lock instead of a key, and the ammo is locked in a separate firesafe box in a hard to get to spot. I love hunting but I love my kids alot more!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The trigger lock needs to be installed in the child's brain.
I agree 100% My kids are being taught everytime they are around guns about safety! Every chance I get they hear the same old safety tips over and over so they will hear it in their heads even when I'm not saying it! The best way to keep kids safe around guns is to expose them to guns and how to be safe and respect guns!
 

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Agreed Jim! Luknikk does the same with ours. Our 4 year old (lukas) will tell you if you are doing something wrong even if it's a toy gun. The kids that aren't taught respect and safety are the ones that are too curious and unfortunately, someone usually gets hurt.
 

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Its all good.

Even leaving a bow out can have bad consequences.

How many adult knuckleheads have hurt themselves trying draw or dry-fire a bow?

When I was 8 y/o, my oldest brother had taught me how to shoot both bow and gun. He taught me how to string a recurve and never to use or handle my bow without his supervision.

One day I decided to show-off to my neighborhood friends. My brother found-out and took my bow away - for good. He told me I would not be allowed to shoot with him again until I could afford my own bow. That went for both bow and gun.

I was devastated but it sunk in that he was trying to protect me.

After about a year, he let me shoot again. He still took me hunting in the interim of my probation, but refrained from letting me handle bow or gun, ever reminding me that I breached the trust.

That was a hard lesson but well worth it. Mind you he didn't punish me by excluding me - he still took me and my brothers to the range.

When he had kids of his own he taught them the same lesson.

When my nephew was 5 y/o (he's 19 now) my brother says: "show your Uncle your knife." He looked at my brother as if needing more approval and slowly produced an old heirloom pocket knife.

"What's the rule?" my brother asked.
My nephew recited a few lines about being safe and asking permission and of course the consequences of breaking the rules: no knife - no shooting - no fun.

The kid knew the rules - today he's a tremendous hunter and a good student, and a good kid.

Bagged his first boar when he was 9.
 
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