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I started shooting my brand new PSE bruin today and i love it... I sited in my pins for 10,15,and 20 yards. Is this a good calibration for my bow? Im shooting good groupings at 20 yards...BTW during the archery field course test, how far are the targets?

Here a pic at 20 yards

~20 yards 2 arrows
 

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I believe that the target is 10 to 20 yards and you need 3 of 5 arrows in the kill zone...nothing to worry about...keep on practicing!
 

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I sited in my pins for 10,15,and 20 yards. Is this a good calibration for my bow? Im shooting good groupings at 20 yards...BTW during the archery field course test, how far are the targets?
Yes. I set my pins at 10, 20, and 30.

If you shoot well out to 20 yards you should be ok for the field test.

When I took the test, you had the option of shooting between 10 and 20 yards.

I believe I 'loosed' three arrows - two in the vitals.

The field test is to see if you can draw properly as well as getting one in the vitals. They want to see if you can handle 'your bow'.

Depending on who gives the test, you may get tips or advice to improve your shooting.

Good luck and good hunting!
 

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Mike,

Here's what I would do:

1) I shoot groups of 5 arrows at the target. This will give you a feel of how you really are shooting.

2) When shooting, try to aim at a very specific spot on your target. I'd shoot at the top tip of the triangle.
3) Shoot a few sets of arrows to warm up. Then, shoot your 1st actual round. Depending on how this grouping looks, change you pins accordingly. Then shoot like 2-3 more rounds. Adjust again.
4) Unless I'm just beginning the sight-in process, I don't like to make more than 2 adjustments in 1 day.

Most people will say that at 20 yds you should be able to reliably shoot 2-3" groupings.

Good luck,
David
 

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10-20 yards and you can pretty much choose where you shoot.

Personally I would not put pins at 10-15-20. Put a pin a 20 and shoot it for anthing from 20 in. If a target is closer than 10 yards, use your 30 yard pin (archers paradox)

-dan
 

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Looks like you are shooting pretty well for it being your first bow.[up]

In your case, I would probably go with a single pin set to about 20-25 yards. Practice with it to learn how much compensation you need for other distances.

Another note about bow practice. Dont practice too much, and make sure you are engraining the proper form and shot sequence. Off target practice is better than on target practice. Practice drawing your bow properly and holding proper form in a mirror. Have a shot sequence that you go through on every shot as well. This will help ensure you always do everything the same.

Example of a shot sequence;

check for proper stance
set proper bow-hand grip
pre-aim the bow slightly above the aim point
draw the bow back to anchor and place finger on trigger
check anchor, sight level, pin selection, etc
concentrate on the spot you intend to hit
commit to the shot by starting your back tension
dont stop concentrating on the spot until you come to the conclusion. (conclusion could be the arrow hitting the target, the bow falling from your hand, etc.)


Remember, perfect practice makes perfect....

:)
 

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My 20 pin works for all shorter ranges. The distance gap between your pins depends on how flat the bow shoots. It looks like you are using carbon arrows. Carbons are very flat shooting.
 

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If a target is closer than 10 yards, use your 30 yard pin (archers paradox)
This year is the first season serious with bow. Can you explain this? More info would really be appreciated.
 

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Shooting targets is one thing and shooting animals another.Could be your on and torqing your bow hand or peeking to see because you are consistant.Could be any number of things. Have you paper tested yet for flight?
 

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Shooting targets is one thing and shooting animals another
[up]I agree. I'm good in the yard to about 35 yards. I missed 3 shots at dear this year by not guessing the distance correctly. It sure a lot different in the woods.
 

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Archers Paradox,

I actually, just looked it up, and I misused the term!
I was refering to trajectory. Basically, you shoot up, then the arrow flight flattens, then drops, depending on where this peak is depends on where you hit the target. Lets say this, target is 20 yards away. Arrow leaves bow and is at an upward angle. As the arrow is flattening out, it hits the target.

Put the same target at 30 yards, use the same pin. The arrow will hit low because during flight, it reached its peak (20 yards) then started to come back down.

Ok put the same target at 10 yards, and you will hit low again, but not because of drop this time, but because the arrow is still rising to the 20 yard peak in trajectory.

Archers Paradox is caused when releasing most using fingers. It pushes the string to the side, causing the arrow to fishtail. Fletching helps stop the fishtailing.
 

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OH, and MATTY, to add to your practice sequence.

NEVER DRAW A BOW WITH A RELEASE WITH OUT HAVING AN ARROW ON THE STRING!

Especially if you are telling him to put his finger on the trigger.

-dan
 

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Thanks Dan. It makes sense. [up]
 

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Oh yeah....guess I skipped that step. :eek:

Nock an arrow and clip your release to the string is the first step.

I wasnt talking about off target practice for that part though.

Off target practice is best done with a bow simulator. Whether it be something like the Vibracheck Safe-draw, or a simple wooden handle and a string that you can clip your release to. If you are checking form in a mirror with your bow, keep your finger behind the trigger.

(thanks for catching that Dan, I always seem to overlook the obvious when giving internet directions)
 

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I have a hair trigger on my release - my finger is behind it until I'm ready to shoot.
 

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No problem Matty,

Just a pet pev of mine. I have seen and heard too many bows dry fired. Spend a saturday at cabelas archery dept, I bet you hear at least one go off.

And saddly, they just get put back on the rack.

-dan
 

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pla930, a hair trigger on a bow release is the last thing you want.

You should have a heavy trigger with a little bit of travel. This allows you to set your finger onto the trigger and pull with back muscles.

Hair triggers eventually lead to anticipating the shot, (TARGET PANIC).

Target panic is HORRIBLE....Overcoming a terrible case of it years ago is what made me want to help other archers.
 

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Other side of it is punching the release, if you have it set too heavy. Like Matty said, you want your form to produce the shot, not punch the shot or anticipat the shot.

Shooting with fingers, or a true Back tension release will really help you understand the proper mechanics of using a trigger release. And don't let anyone tell you that you cannot shoot a trigger release using proper back tension, you can, and you get that explosive release that proper archery form delivers.

-dan
 

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pla930, a hair trigger on a bow release is the last thing you want.
I have been reluctant to tamper with the release - it's working well but I should loosen the trigger.

It's a tru-fire release and its been 'hair trigger' right out of the box.
 
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