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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering who else is applying for their moose permit in Maine and New Hampshire.

Ryan

Both states permits are coming up in January 2006. I have bonus points in Maine. I have my son as sub-permittee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bill,

Nine years for me. I know it will happen just when. I love that state. The first time I went up there in 1984, I was like man there isn't any trash on the ground anywhere. I hope it stays like that.

Ryan

PS I will be trying NH for the first time this year.
 

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It's just a tough draw up there in Maine. They only have like 1000 nonresident permits and I heard they get 10's of thousands of applications. How many chances do you usually apply for Ryan? I usually pay for 10 plus my bonus points. It' good to see there are some people from N.J.that draw one every year up there.
 

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I've been applying for Maine moose since 1985 and every year I tell myself the same thing..."maybe this will be the year???"
 

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My Cousin lives in New Hampshire and has Bagged a Moose. I have seen them while deer hunting and they are GIGANTIC!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
20 chances, (2) 10 chance shots. $106 bucks, no wonder they can afford those nice wool suits. If I ever get a permit, I'm going to add up all the money just to see how much. It will still be worth it. I'm going to BC in 2007. All ready for that trip. I figured I'd try Maine. I'd love to go with my son while he is young. When he gets old I take him out west and up north of the border.

Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'd love to get mine. I think more so then the regular lottery. Okay, not really but, it would be a nice gift. I'm surprised more don't apply from here. I'll let you know if I get lucky... with the permit that is.

Ryan
 

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ww,,Been applying for years. My buddy in Maine was drawn in 99. I was co shooter. We took a 40" bull weighing 750lb.(pic in my gallery) His brother was drawn last year and took a small 700lb bull. The two boys up there have been drawn and scored on a 55" and a 56" in the last 7 yrs. Helps being a resident. Good luck.
 

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I donate every year to NH and I am a resident. NH is only a $10 fee to enter the lottery I believe. If anyone draws NH in ZOne A, A1, A2 or B I'd be happy to walk you right up to them. I could probably even arrainge for you to stay at the family camp up in Columbia, NH.. Well we call it a camp 2bdroom, running water, facilities heat and Sat TV. Find a map and draw a line from Plymouth NH due east and west to the State borders. Anything North of the line you stand a decent chance of tagging one. Anything south and your odds drop drastically except for the far west zone near Keene.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You asked.

New Hampshire's Moose Season
By Kristine Bontaites, Moose Project Leader

The 2005 moose season took place statewide October 15 to 23, 2005, with a total of 525 permits issued. Twenty of these permits were antlerless-only and the remaining 505 were for a moose of any sex.

In 2004, the statewide success rate was 74%, similar to the 2003 success rate of 75%. During the nine-day season in 2004, 388 moose were taken (287 bulls and 101 cows). Regional success rates were similar to past years', with the exception of the Southeast region, which in 2004 had its highest success rate (45%) since 1994.

The North region is the only region with antlerless-only permits. In the past five years, success rates for either-sex permits have ranged from 85 to 95%, while antlerless-only permits ranged from 75 to 94%. This region is dominated by the forest products industry and offers excellent hunting opportunities with good access and the highest density of moose. In 2003, moose seen per hour of hunting ranged from .17 in WMU D1 to .36 in WMU B.

The White Mountain region offers hunters the opportunity for a true wilderness hunt. The bulk of this region lies within the White Mountain National Forest. Access is primarily limited to foot traffic. Hunters must be prepared to get their moose out without motorized vehicles. Fish and Game issues 115 either-sex permits here. Success rates have ranged from 61 to 72% in the last five years. In 2003, moose seen per hour of hunting ranged from .07 to .25.

The Central region is more heavily settled than those regions to the north. Moose densities are good, as is access. Land ownership here and in the two remaining regions is primarily individual landowners. In 2003, hunters saw from .08 to .15 moose per hunting hour. Success rates ranged from 59 to 72% the previous five years.

Hunters in the Southwest region have seen from .08 to .21 moose per hour, and yearlings have comprised up to 17% of the bull take. This region has seen the greatest fluctuation in success rates, ranging from 48 to 80% over the last five years. Land ownership and development patterns are similar to those in the Central region, and moose densities are only slightly lower.

The Southeast region has very high human population densities and the lowest moose density in the state. Access is limited, and hunters will need to do considerable scouting and contacting of property owners to have a successful hunt. Success rates are usually in the low 30%s, but in 2003 dropped to 20%. Moose seen per hour ranged from .03 to .08. In 2004, hunters in the Southeast region had their highest success rate (45%) since 1994.

NOTE: You must have landowner permission before using an ATV on privately owned land. All hunters should be prepared to get their moose out of the woods on foot.

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Moose Season Quick Facts

Average dressed weight of all yearling bulls taken in 2004 was 449 pounds. The average dressed weight of all bulls aged 5.5 and older in 2004 was 774 pounds.
The largest bull moose ever taken weighed in at 1,040 pounds, dressed weight. Live weight of this moose would have been approximately 1,400 pounds. The largest cow ever taken dressed at 815 pounds. These two animals came from Zone A2 and both were taken in 1993.
Greatest antler spread measurement for moose taken in New Hampshire is 68 inches. This bull was 9.5 years of age, had 22 points and weighed 785 pounds dressed. The antler beam diameter was 67mm. This animal was taken in A1 in 1996.
Moose have been taken with the use of conventional firearms and archery, handguns, muzzleloaders (including flintlocks) and the longbow. In 2004, 95% of hunters took their moose using conventional firearms (rifle or shotgun).
66% of the harvest occurred in the first 3 days of the 2004 season. 46% of the harvest occurred between 1/2 hour before sunrise and 10 a.m.
Successful hunters spent, on average, 34 hours scouting, saw .13 moose/hour in the scouted area and 77% of them got their moose in the area they scouted (scouting figures from 2003 hunt).
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Moose Hunt Basics
Each permit holder (permittee) may select one person of any age (subpermittee) to join him or her on the moose hunt.

Both either-sex and antlerless-only permits may be issued in some units.

The limit is one moose per permit, which may be shot by either hunter. Those drawing an antlerless-only permit may take one antlerless moose. All other permit holders may take either an antlered or antlerless moose.

Archery, muzzleloader, and regular firearms hunting are allowed, according to the hunting license type the hunter possesses.

Hunting is permitted by unit assignment, made as a result of the preferences listed on the application form and the order in which the applicant ranks in the drawing. Hunters may hunt only in the unit assigned to them.

The percentage of permits issued to nonresidents will be the same as the percentage of hunting licenses sold to nonresidents in the previous year (approximately 10 to 15 percent). The odds of being selected were about 1 in 25 for residents and 1 in 75 for non-residents last year. These odds are among the best in the nation for moose hunting.

Moose hunters must carry their valid moose permit and N.H. hunting license with them at all times while hunting moose.


License and permit fees

Resident Nonresident
Hunting $ 22.00 $103.00
Archery $ 22.00 $ 73.00
Moose Permit (regular hunting or archery license also required) $100.00 $300.00

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Moose Hunt Lottery
Moose hunting permits are offered to successful lottery applicants following a computer-generated random drawing. Anyone who obtained a moose permit in 2003, 2004 or 2005 is not eligible to obtain a permit in 2006. Applications will be available in late January 2006. The application deadline is May 26, 2006. To apply for the lottery online, click here.

Since the 2004 lottery, N.H. Fish and Game has had a point system to aid repeat unsuccessful applicants in getting a permit. Unsuccessful applicants accrue one point for each consecutive year that they apply for the lottery. Each point translates to a chance in the drawing; i.e., the first year you apply, you have one chance in the lottery; in the second year, you have two chances; etc. Please note: applicants lose all accrued points if they do not apply to the lottery for one year, or if they are offered and accept a moose permit. Click here for more information on the lottery bonus point system.


Lottery Drawing
Permittee candidates are selected through a computer-generated random number draw. The 2006 drawing will take place June 23, 2006.

Each applicant selected in the lottery drawing is assigned to hunt within a unit of his or her choice, except when the permit quota for that unit has already been filled. In cases where the quota in the appliant's first choice unit has been filled, the applicant will be assigned to the next unfilled unit of his or her choice as indicated on the application. Any unit not ranked on the application form indicates that the applicant does not wish to hunt in that unit, even if it is the only unit where a permit quota has not yet been filled. Alternate candidates are selected to fill any permits not taken by the original applicants selected.


Notification of winners
Successful applicants are notified within 10 working days of the drawing. Moose hunting permits and information packets are mailed in August.

If your name is drawn, a nonrefundable payment of $100 for residents and $300 for nonresidents must be postmarked no later than midnight July 14, 2006, or received at Fish and Game headquarters in Concord no later than July 28, 2006.

Failure to submit payment by the deadline will result in disqualification of the applicant and the permit will be offered to an alternate candidate.
 

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I am putting in for NH an Maine. This is my first year putting in.

-dan
 
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