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It seems like the geese and ducks fly right after sunset by me. I don't hunt a roost, the birds are just hungry and want to land in my decoys to eat. Why can't we hunt until a half hour after sunset for waterfowl?
 

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My guess is that ducks land in water, which can be moving, so recovery in the dark is difficult if not impossible.
 

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^ along with that, identifying certain species could be even more difficult at that time frame and jump shooting guys after sunset is extra dangerous. In my opinion, we should be allowed to hunt a half hour after for geese but then again, there are some guys that would claim to misidentify a swan or heron as a goose.
 

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The rules are only suggestive.... Have at it!!!
That's how I look at it.....Its like this, you have a 60 day duck season in each zone...You're allowed 2 pintails per day for example...Well, that way I see it that's a 120 pintails per zone...so what if I kill 15 in one day and don't kill one for 2 weeks it all averages out.....
 

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^^^Had to think about that for a few seconds. I'm putting the drink down now![drinking]
 

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Well clearly you don't understand waterfowl or their behavior, because if you did, you would understand why A.) The birds are moving at near dark and B.) Why there is a restriction on hunting during this period and C.) Why this restriction is lifted for Spring snow goose conservation season.

The birds are moving near dark because of HUNTING PRESSURE. They are not stupid animals and are attempting to preserve their existence by waiting until dark to move to their roost. This is to avoid predators. Roosting is important for waterfowl species and biologists understand this. By restricting hunter to sunset and not 30 minutes after, is an attempt to allow the ducks and geese an opportunity to enter their roosting area free of human interference. If they cannot roost, they will not stay long, they will leave the area.

Flip the coin and look at the snow goose conservation season. Way too many snow geese, the population is in serious jeopardy. Lifting the sunset restriction is an attempt to inflict further casualties on the population.


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Well clearly you don't understand waterfowl or their behavior, because if you did, you would understand why A.) The birds are moving at near dark and B.) Why there is a restriction on hunting during this period and C.) Why this restriction is lifted for Spring snow goose conservation season.

The birds are moving near dark because of HUNTING PRESSURE. They are not stupid animals and are attempting to preserve their existence by waiting until dark to move to their roost. This is to avoid predators. Roosting is important for waterfowl species and biologists understand this. By restricting hunter to sunset and not 30 minutes after, is an attempt to allow the ducks and geese an opportunity to enter their roosting area free of human interference. If they cannot roost, they will not stay long, they will leave the area.

Flip the coin and look at the snow goose conservation season. Way too many snow geese, the population is in serious jeopardy. Lifting the sunset restriction is an attempt to inflict further casualties on the population.


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Judging by your post, I'm not sure you really understand waterfowl behavior either..."Let me just rant, throw in some science terms about waterfowl biology, preserving existence, roosting, behavior & I can make a convincing argument."

If you think waterfowl move near dark solely due to hunting pressure, you are severely misguided. While hunting pressure does influence bird movement (i.e. birds moving from heavily pressured areas to less pressured areas or even refuges), and they'll even use previous experience to avoid high pressure areas. Their movement at dawn and dusk however, are innate life history strategies irregardless of hunting pressures. Predawn movement is actually their movement back from night time feeding areas to where they want to roost & loaf for the day. Pre/post-dusk..just the opposite..heading out to feed. So birds moving at dusk are going to feed..and feeding areas differ from roosting areas, right? So we are actually restricting the hunter 30 minutes after sunset so birds can go FEED without human intervention..Look at birds during the day when they loaf..they are out in the middle (more often than not) in any body of water...far from where any hunter can touch them...so thats what the 30 minute restriction is supposed to reflect? Doubtful.. Heck, read a study or two..look at how the direction birds fly at night, the peak flights post-dusk, how movement is driven moreso by weather, whether they are local or migratory flights, overwintering ducks, what have you.....You will see very little text that suggests hunting pressures drive movement at specific times of the day..
 

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Judging by your post, I'm not sure you really understand waterfowl behavior either..."Let me just rant, throw in some science terms about waterfowl biology, preserving existence, roosting, behavior & I can make a convincing argument."

If you think waterfowl move near dark solely due to hunting pressure, you are severely misguided. While hunting pressure does influence bird movement (i.e. birds moving from heavily pressured areas to less pressured areas or even refuges), and they'll even use previous experience to avoid high pressure areas. Their movement at dawn and dusk however, are innate life history strategies irregardless of hunting pressures. Predawn movement is actually their movement back from night time feeding areas to where they want to roost & loaf for the day. Pre/post-dusk..just the opposite..heading out to feed. So birds moving at dusk are going to feed..and feeding areas differ from roosting areas, right? So we are actually restricting the hunter 30 minutes after sunset so birds can go FEED without human intervention..Look at birds during the day when they loaf..they are out in the middle (more often than not) in any body of water...far from where any hunter can touch them...so thats what the 30 minute restriction is supposed to reflect? Doubtful.. Heck, read a study or two..look at how the direction birds fly at night, the peak flights post-dusk, how movement is driven moreso by weather, whether they are local or migratory flights, overwintering ducks, what have you.....You will see very little text that suggests hunting pressures drive movement at specific times of the day..
Not to be rude, but do you have a formal education in a wildlife science field? I have a Bachelor of Science in Fish and Wildlife management. By no means does that qualify me as an expert, but I would love to see what "text" you read about waterfowl feeding at night. Not everything you read in a book is true.

Waterfowl will feed at night, but this is not considered a "normal" behavior. Moon phases, cold fronts, local food sources etc. are some common reasons for waterfowl to feed at night, but generally, they do not. Tell me how often do you see Canada Geese feeding in an agricultural field at night? Possibly on a full moon, as snow geese are known to do. Migrating waterfowl (not resident, because for this discussion we're talking about Federal Migratory bird regulations), typically migrate south, at night, during peak moon phases, generally.

Waterfowl generally roost at night. They have feeding periods during the day, and usually have a midday roost (such as you described them resting in the middle of the bay). Waterfowl cannot see AS WELL in the dark, they can see enough to migrate but any duck hunter should know that ducks cannot see color at night. We've all experienced decoying birds well before shooting time, birds trying to land while we're setting decoys etc.

If you think I am incorrect, go check out any refuge or pond that holds waterfowl and see how many birds are pouring in near dark. It is a roost. The law is designed to prevent harassment of migrating waterfowl close to their roosting time. When birds start flying later and later, it is due to hunting pressure. Usually these are LOCAL birds. Most migrating waterfowl would get out of dodge very quickly if they were not able to rest and feed safely.


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I'm not an expert by any means...but with 20 years of gunning...This I know...whether hunting the bay front or small ponds and lakes in the marsh...The birds usually fly inland as the sun sets...Whether it's to eat or sleep..I don't know this...But if they allowed hunting 30 mins after sunset there would be a significant decrease in the amount of birds around. ..Sitting around a lake for hours and nothing flying. ..The sun sets and hundreds of birds start flying inland
 
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