New Jersey Hunters banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,462 Posts
I recall when I was a kid a friend was bitten by a rabid dog. The treatment involved a long fairly large diameter needle in the stomach several times. For the sake of those bitten I hope they have come up with a better way to treat rabies in humans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,463 Posts
I recall when I was a kid a friend was bitten by a rabid dog. The treatment involved a long fairly large diameter needle in the stomach several times. For the sake of those bitten I hope they have come up with a better way to treat rabies in humans.
It's funny that there's such a hysteria associated with the Ebola virus (which has a reported mortality rate between 50 & 70 percent) yet no one bats an eye at rabies in the U.S. which will kill 100% of it's victims who become symptomatic.

There is no known cure for rabies that is recognized by the medical community at large. The "treatment" for rabies exposure is a series of post exposure inoculations that aim to prevent the replication of the virus in the victim who is exposed, by triggering an antibody response. Once a victim becomes symptomatic, however, a cure is no longer possible & death is a near certainty.

The good news is that with timely post-exposure treatment, prevention of the disease is virtually guaranteed. The new treatment protocol involves a series of 4 intramuscular injections for previously non-immunized individuals. The previous protocol of abdominal injections is a thing of the past.

A pre-exposure rabies vaccine is also available. People who work with rabies in laboratory settings and animal control and wildlife officers are just a few of the people who should consider rabies pre-exposure vaccinations.

CDC - Rabies

http://www.state.nj.us/health/cd/rabies/index.shtml



BTW, death by rabies virus is a horrible way to go ...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I'm guessing he killed the yote with a bow either when he was walking in or walking out? No easy feat from the ground when the thing is attacking you. Yet another good reason for a sportsman's carry permit.

It's funny that there's such a hysteria associated with the Ebola virus (which has a reported mortality rate between 50 & 70 percent) yet no one bats an eye at rabies in the U.S. which will kill 100% of it's victims who become symptomatic.

There is no known cure for rabies that is recognized by the medical community at large. The "treatment" for rabies exposure is a series of post exposure inoculations that aim to prevent the replication of the virus in the victim who is exposed, by triggering an antibody response. Once a victim becomes symptomatic, however, a cure is no longer possible & death is a near certainty.

The good news is that with timely post-exposure treatment, prevention of the disease is virtually guaranteed. The new treatment protocol involves a series of 4 intramuscular injections for previously non-immunized individuals. The previous protocol of abdominal injections is a thing of the past.

A pre-exposure rabies vaccine is also available. People who work with rabies in laboratory settings and animal control and wildlife officers are just a few of the people who should consider rabies pre-exposure vaccinations.
Thanks for the info, but holy crap-that video is going to give me nightmares. I had heard that in the 3rd World that human deaths from rabies are still somewhat common but had never seen anything like that [eek]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,644 Posts
You've got to be kidding. I can't imagine anyone going thru that here. They would knock you out with morphine before that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,463 Posts
Thanks for the info, but holy crap-that video is going to give me nightmares. I had heard that in the 3rd World that human deaths from rabies are still somewhat common but had never seen anything like that

The number of rabies-related human deaths in the United States has declined from more than 100 annually at the turn of the century to one or two per year in the 1990's. Of the estimated 35,000–55,000 rabies deaths every year worldwide, more than 95% occur as a result of dog bites in the developing countries of Africa and Asia.

In the United States, human fatalities associated with rabies occur in people who fail to seek medical assistance, usually because they were unaware of their exposure. Modern day prophylaxis has proven nearly 100% successful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,185 Posts
Luckily, the coyote was quickly confirmed to be carrying rabies and the two victims can get treatments ASAP. Our neighbors had a bat in their home this spring that wound up dead and had rabies. Out of an abundance of caution, the entire family got the shots. They said they were no fun, but not the worse thing in the world either. They are all fine months later and likely never got exposed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Luckily, the coyote was quickly confirmed to be carrying rabies and the two victims can get treatments ASAP. Our neighbors had a bat in their home this spring that wound up dead and had rabies. Out of an abundance of caution, the entire family got the shots. They said they were no fun, but not the worse thing in the world either. They are all fine months later and likely never got exposed.
Better safe than sorry, especially considering the alternative. I had heard that bats are the most common vectors of rabies in humans and it turns out that's true. Reading some of these stories will make your skin crawl though:

CDC - Bats: Learning about bats and rabies - Rabies
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,383 Posts
I hate Yotes, its just a matter of time before a pack drag away some small child, then maybe someone will do something about these animals introduced into the state by our friendly F & G.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,501 Posts
will do something about these animals introduced into the state by our friendly F & G.
here we go again. Proof please.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,004 Posts
Regardless of how they got here the state, at least the northern counties, is loaded with them. Hardly anyone hunts them. I think I went for 'yotes twice last winter. They should make the season 365 days a year.
Even if they did, do you think the harvest would be much? Arent they extremely difficult to kill due to: A) nocturnal B) high intelligence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
WOW That is effin scary. And that video, wow! I honestly had no idea it was that bad, turn you in to a possessed person. Scary I don't have many yotes where I live but if I did Id hunt them any chance I had.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top