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Population will stay low unless this state does something about the habitat. Hunting them less and/or waiting for them to repopulate based on time will have little impact on the population. Its all about the habitat.
 

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Numerous studies prove that hunter mortality has little or no effect on grouse numbers. As others said, it's all about the need for more early successional habitat. The state is doing some cutting, but we need a lot more of it. That said, zone 3 still has decent grouse populations in places if you know where to look.
 

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Numerous studies prove that hunter mortality has little or no effect on grouse numbers. As others said, it's all about the need for more early successional habitat. The state is doing some cutting, but we need a lot more of it. That said, zone 3 still has decent grouse populations in places if you know where to look.
Exactly.

There was another thread on this site talking about the same thing. I can't find it. But basically the same info.

Go up north to the Logging states. You will find a healthy population of Grouse (aka partridge). I hit maine for a week this year. It was one of my favorite hunting trips. If you like hunting for grouse, go there. It worth it.
 

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I've mentioned this before, but I sit on a task force that is working to help the state perform more successful cuts in our forests where it makes sense not only for ruffed grouse (that's PAH-tridge to you Mainers), but non-game species like golden winged warblers, a federally endangered species. Also, many plant species that are rapidly disappearing from our forests under the maturing canopies need sunlight and benefit from forest openings provided we can properly control our deer numbers. There has been decades of knee-jerk response to the fact that all of our northern NJ forests were 100% clear cut in the late 1800s/early 1900s, and the result has been no cutting and a forest(s) that are now all the same age. Add a lack of natural fires and the fact that we fight disease and insect damage and you have no new early successional or mid-successional forests which benefit many species including grouse and woodcock.

The lands we hunt in Potter County, PA have consistently been logged for decades and we have a tremendous grouse and woodcock population there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
i thought they logged some areas at the watershed last year was hoping new growth would have helped i used to see dozens along cannistear and ridge rds but this week i saw zip in new milford pa the grouse are flying in groups of 12 i was supprised the land owner has his land timbered every 5 years hemlock oak old growth he refuses to let me hunt them claims im seeing the same 2 birds all day
 
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