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ive never hunted fall turkey before and my boss asked me to take him and his son this year out for fall turkey. i know you break up the flock then what do you do just sit down and start calling?
 

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You are typically hunting flocks that consist of hens and their grown poults.
You bust the flock then attempt to call them in as they re-group. You will need to learn assembly yelps and kee-kee runs.
During the fall, Gobblers may be found in small bachlor groups and are tougher to call in after scattering them, They are not a anxious to get back together as the Hens and Poults.
You will need to have lots of patience and learn Gobbler Yelps to call in longbeards in the fall.

Good Luck.
 

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I was wondering some of the same questions. I was thinking of picking up an over the counter for the fall season if I tag out on my buck early. I'm familiar with the basic strategy of busting the flock and calling them back in and I've learned the different calls used in the fall but I've never actually gone after fall turkey. I'd like to give it a try.
 

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I have been fall turkey hunting and I am not a fan of busting up a flock and then calling them back. I think it is counter productive to find them and then run in like a maniac so I can call in them back in to where they were before I broke the party up. For me the best bet is to scout a flock. Turkey are much more consistent in the fall alot less pressure and less feeding areas. They tend to follow routines which in some cases you could set a clock too. I have been successful by scouting an area and locating activity. This is easier in the fall because flocks tend to be large and the signs are unmistakable. I particulary look for feeding sites that are on or around a ridge. I hunt hardwoods so I look for mature trees with alot of acorns. The signs will be in the immediate area around the base of the trees. It is difficult if not impossible to sneek upon them so understanding fall patterns is the key. I set up in the area I am going to hunt and I use assembly yelps to get the flock moving (sooner) to the area that they are inevitably going to come too. I have experienced one problem. They will often come in completely silent as such sleeping on the job could ruin your hunt. They will also come in from various angles since the flocks are so large it is important to sight one in and take the shot as any movement will send them running. I hope this helps just some of my ideas.
 

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I wouldn't bust flocks on public land. Fall turkey hunting in NJ, on public land, is crowded. Reminds me of the scene in Jaws when they put the bounty on the shark and everyone with a boat is fishing (or throwing grenades) in a huge pack with no room [ko]

I really like turkey hunting, but I don't do it in the Fall here.
 

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Learn your young bird sounds like mike said kee kee runs lost sounds and excited re-groups. busting a flock down here in the south part of the state can back fire because they can fly a good ways LOL

I was doing a ground hog Job yeasterday and had a hen and a couple youngins walk past the little one was 4 to 6 inches tall the little sucker flew up on a fence 6 feet up and landed was not the most graceful thing but got it done LOL
 

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How many of you guys who do turkey hunt the fall season go out specifically for turkey with a shotgun, vs. buying a turkey permit for an incidental turkey while bowhunting for deer, because the seasons overlap? Or do you bring the bow and shotgun for the treestand which is legal if carrying both permits.
I personally specifically hunt turkey with the shotgun, but curious where other's interest is.
 
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