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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw SO much activity at the farm for being first time out in the field. My older brother finally got off his a$$ and got his bow licence, so it was his first time out. Got in around 330pm, put him in a lower latter stand(he's not very used to shooting from high climbing sticks hang on stands), and i got in one of the high stands. The deer were TEARING apart the corn field(about 30 acres). you could see them all over the place. I counted 4 different fawns, 7 does, and 2 bucks(only spike and tall 4 pointer). But there were still some i couldnt make out bc they were in the corn.

I saw a bunch of deer that were probably within range for most guys, about 30-35 yds, but being the first time in the stand this year, i didnt want to hail mary a shot. Also, a lot of branches still holding leaves were making some shots questionable. Finally around 6:15pm i had a doe and a couple others move in. Saw an opportunity at 15 yards and took it. Pass through, center mass. Thought it was a great shot. She ran about 15 yards, looked around and wandered slowly into the corn field.

Waited an hour, texted my brother and said its time to track. Arrow was soaked in blood, still sticking the ground. Trailed the blood from the edge of the field to the corn edge. Had good blood high on the corn for about 15 yards, then it started to thin out for another 10 yards, and then started to get drips for another 10 yards and then...NOTHING. Finally, i was like.."what the F$%^?" This deer just upped and vanished like a fart in the wind. After 2 hours walking in circles through the corn maze, i said to my brother..let's regroup in the morning.

Walked in at 7am this morning to the same location. Found 2..i repeat, 2 more blood spots from where we left off last night. i start pacing the corn every 30 yards looking down the rows for a body. Did probably 5-6 back and forths before i said let me check the outskirts of the field. The field is bordered by a small brook. Rethinkng my shot, if i didnt hit a lung, the shot may have been a little farther back than i thought and maybe i clipped the liver. I started walking the edge of the brook on the far side of the field and within 15 minutes, found the doe, in the middle of the stream with water dribbling over parts of her. $hit, $hit, $hit...she smelled foul and i knew she was coyote/fox dinner.

She ended up being about 200 yards from where i hit her. At least the farmer wont have to worry about this one getting any more corn. It's AMAZING how much these deer have torn up those 30 acres. i really feel bad for him. But i can only continue to decrease the herd so that he does not have these issues in the future.

thanks for listening, hopefully i'll be able to put some meat in the freezer for the next one.[up]
 

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It happens. In this weather it's tough if you can't get 'em right away. Better luck on the next one!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In a perfect world, no one would intend to let a deer lay over night. But then again, not everyone can be as "smart" as you GVS..i guess the rest of us hunting afternoons right now are just "dumb".
 

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GVS if that's the best you've got to offer why not keep it to yourself? [down]
 

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Some one tell me whyit's okay to stick a deer at last light when it's 70 plus degrees outside.

I say it's irresponsible at best but more likely DUMB
 

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i dont think anyone plans on not finding their deer after a shot.do you? maybe you should only hunt winter bow so its cold enough when you cant find your deer.I know for myself atleast every deer i shot at i plan on finding as soon as possible if it 70 degree's or 10 [email protected] happens sometimes you can't find them for a lond time,and bears/yotes eat them,should i not shoot a deer if there is bears/yotes around ??????
 

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dont think anyone plans on not finding their deer after a shot.do you?
No but it happens and when bow hunting it's typicall to have to track a deer after waiting, it's hard enough to blood trail a deer in september let alone in the dark so you often have to wait until morning. If its a warm afternoon and you know it's gonna be a warm night then the responsible thing to do is skip the afternoon hunt.

Come October the nights will be cool. It's not like there are not enough days to hunt in this state.

So hunt the mornings and leave the afternoon hunts for cooler weather.

I just dont understand.
 

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here we go again!! why must every thread on this website lead to someone nit picking and causing unnecessary drama. "I just don't understand blah blah blah blah."

Listen man, sorry you lost your deer but good job reducing the population. Farmers don't give two shits how you kill them, they just want them dead. Hell I've witnessed a buddy of mine get kicked off a farm for passing up a deer. Farmer was watching him and didn't like the fact that he was passing up does and holding pout for a buck. People don't realize that when hunting farms its not all about Real Tree, Drury Brothers money shot poses, but rather the amount of deer you kill.
 

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must every thread on this website lead to someone nit picking
Not nit picking just sugesting that when it's 80 degrees this coming week perhaps it's best to skip the late afternoon hunt.

bacteria can spoil the meat in only 2 to 4 hours when the temp is over 40 degrees.
 

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Heat is a major cause of wild meat spoiling. Ideally, a hunter won’t harvest an animal unless it is possible to quickly process the carcass and transport it where it can cool quickly.

After tagging a harvested animal, field dress it immediately, and make sure all internal parts, organs and intestines are out. Leaving the windpipe and esophagus inside the carcass, for example, may spoil the meat.

Cool game by propping the chest open with a clean stick and elevating the carcass in a shaded area to allow the air to circulate. It is especially important to get air circulating around the shoulder blades and rump where the meat is thickest. Some hunters will skin the carcass to speed the cooling and pepper the meat to keep it safe from flies and bacteria. Cheesecloth type carcass bags, available at most sporting goods stores, are also a way to protect skinned meat.

Do not allow the carcass to lie on the ground with the hide on, or use airtight game bags or tarps. Both will speed spoilage in warm weather.

Keep in mind that game birds, though small, must also be field dressed and cooled very quickly to prevent spoilage. Avoid putting game birds together in a bag or box, or enclosing them in plastic.

If the temperature is above 50 degrees, the carcass should be taken as quickly as possible to a cooler within hours of the kill.

Being prepared to properly handle game meat this time of year requires good planning and preparation. That includes making a decision before releasing the arrow as to whether you can adequately care for the meat.
 

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GVS has a good point, this time of year it doesn't take long for meat to go bad, but at the same time I highly doubt loyalone expected the doe to go that far. You can never expect to know how far a deer will go before they expire, I've seen them go 100 ft and I've seen them go 100yds, its not like loyalone didn't put in the effort to find her. Whether its dumb or not, he was out there doing what he loves to do and in this sport you win some and loose some, you'll get em next time loyalone.
 

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Heat is a major cause of wild meat spoiling. Ideally, a hunter won’t harvest an animal unless it is possible to quickly process the carcass and transport it where it can cool quickly.

After tagging a harvested animal, field dress it immediately, and make sure all internal parts, organs and intestines are out. Leaving the windpipe and esophagus inside the carcass, for example, may spoil the meat.

Cool game by propping the chest open with a clean stick and elevating the carcass in a shaded area to allow the air to circulate. It is especially important to get air circulating around the shoulder blades and rump where the meat is thickest. Some hunters will skin the carcass to speed the cooling and pepper the meat to keep it safe from flies and bacteria. Cheesecloth type carcass bags, available at most sporting goods stores, are also a way to protect skinned meat.

Do not allow the carcass to lie on the ground with the hide on, or use airtight game bags or tarps. Both will speed spoilage in warm weather.

Keep in mind that game birds, though small, must also be field dressed and cooled very quickly to prevent spoilage. Avoid putting game birds together in a bag or box, or enclosing them in plastic.

If the temperature is above 50 degrees, the carcass should be taken as quickly as possible to a cooler within hours of the kill.

Being prepared to properly handle game meat this time of year requires good planning and preparation. That includes making a decision before releasing the arrow as to whether you can adequately care for the meat.
very well said, but you could have said that first rather than calling the guy or his actions dumb. I know this is America and you have your rights yada yada but calling someone dumb isn't gonna do anything for reinforcing the good point you were trying to make. It puts people on the defensive.

As for hunting in this hot weather, I guess I'm a little old school. I don't normally bow hunt until the second or third week of october.
 

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"But i can only continue to decrease the herd so that he does not have these issues in the future".

You need any help let me know haha, just kiding, but seriously just keep climbing that stand, its pretty obviously they aren't going anywhere as long as that field is there.
 

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Not sure GVS made such a good point. It's common sense that meat will spoil if left to long in the heat. Suggesting that we all forego afternoon hunts in warm weather because it will be dark? A good lantern or half decent flashlight is all that's needed to track. I would venture a guess that the majority of deer hit are found expired within an hour after the shot. There is no reason to call someone dumb after a bad hit... it has happened to all of us at one point.
 
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