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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been scouting a new spot that requires crossing water about 20 yards wide that can vary from 12" to 18" deep depending on where I step and how recently/how much it has rained. Any recommendations on boots that will keep me dry but also keep me warm once I'm sitting during the permit season? I've been looking at LaCrosse boots-always thought they were more for warm weather, but it seems like they've got some cold weather models too. Any other suggestions?
 

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I am hunting an area exactly like that right now. I wear the basic Lacrosse Burly 800 gram with a good merino wool sock. I can sit three hours or more in the twenties and thirties without getting cold feet. They make heavier insulated models too. My wife has the 1000 grams for general hiking. I don't, however, like the smooth back on the heel for use with my Summit climber. I have to really watch having the bungies roll off my heel while climbing. I have an older style Summit Bushmaster with toe straps and heel bungies and it works much better with a regular boot heel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Heavy Duty Garbage bags....One over each foot. Wear what ever boots you want... Cheap, easy, dry.
Thought about that, but I wonder what the traction of plastic on rock snot is like [ko] I'll give it a shot during the day when I'm not carrying anything before I try it at 4:30 a.m. in the middle of January.

Hip boots? change into your normal boots once across
I had a spot where I had to hike a ways so I wore lightweight boots and carried pack boots on my back until I got to my spot, but it eventually just got a be a PITA-one more thing to carry, plus changing boots in the dark, etc...trying to travel light and keep it simple these days. I suppose I could just ditch them on the bank when I get to the other side and pick them up on the way out.
 

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Lacross Alpha Burley 18" them come in 800/1000/1200 good for most any weather.
 

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I don't find any rubber boot warm enough for cold weather because they just don't breath and the feet will sweat no matter what, but thats me. If you say spots are 18 inches deep your sol because all those rubbers top out at 18. I do what was mentioned earlier is bring hip boots and change out. You could also set a few cinder blocks down across creek as steeping stones or use four blocks with three 12foot 2x10's to span the gap for a submerged hidden bridge that will get you out of the water enough to wear reagular boots and if the water is cloudy enough only you'll know about it I also found old alluminum extension ladders make execellent bridges with some old wood strapped to the the rungs but twenty yards I think the steeping blocks or submerged bridge with rubber boots is the answer. I hunt a lot of flooded areas.

Oh and remember as you step your 18 inch boot turns into a 16 or 14inch boot with the angle of your stride.
 

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18 Inches is too deep for knee high boots, I would use hip boots. Your hunt could be over in a hurry. Especially if your going in the dark. Just leave them by the stream.
 

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I do the hip boot thing too. I'd rather be inconvenienced carrying them in and changing, than miss a good sit because of wet feet.
 

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Hip boots. I buy them slightly oversize so they slide off nice and easy when you get to the other side. The area I bear hunted was like that. If you have a lot of rock snot string a guide rope to hang on to across the river. depending on how far the stream crossing is from your truck a 5:30am swim in 34 degree water with 15 degree air temps can get ugly really quickly.
 

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I've crossed many a creek up to 12" in my LaCrosse SST 2000gr and even hiked up stream a few times mid winter to get the jump on a deer. No worries.
 
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