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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is from NAHC email:
Anti's Purchase British Columbia
Outfitting Rights


BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA—In what some say could become a frightening trend, an anti-hunting organization has purchased the guiding and outfitting rights to a prime piece of British Columbia wilderness with the sole intent of permanently ending commercial hunting in the area.

During late November, the anti-hunting organization Raincoast Conservation Foundation (RCF) paid a reported $1.35 million to acquire the guiding and outfitting rights to five contiguous hunting regions along the central British Columbia coast. The regions are home to such wildlife species as grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, mountain lions, mountain goats, moose and deer.

According to British Columbia's provincial regulations, licensed guides and outfitters must continue to facilitate some hunting in areas for which they're responsible. RCF Conservation Director Ian McAllister says the RCF will live up to those obligations by allowing the hunting of some "hoofed grazing animals." The RCF will hold the area's guiding and outfitting license indefinitely, although the province will charge it an annual fee, which will be negotiated.

The RCF purchased the rights from former outfitter Leonard Ellis, who had held the guiding and outfitting rights to the territory since 1981. Ellis, who operates the Bella Coola Outfitting Company, says he'll now lead wildlife viewing tours.
 

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Wow. I hope Ellis didnt sell them this land knowing antis were buying it..Talk about a sell out if he did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Isn’t same happening here in NJ? New owners posting their land and not allowing any hunting on it.
 

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This is just inevitable. Hunters will eventually have to purchase their own land or pool their resources to continue hunting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
More info:
Nicholas Read, Vancouver Sun
Published: Tuesday, December 13, 2005


For the first time in B.C. history, an anti-hunting group has bought the guide-outfitting rights to a prime piece of the province's wilderness with a view to ending permanently the commercial killing of all animals in the area.

Late in November, the Raincoast Conservation Foundation paid $1.35 million to acquire the guide-outfitting rights to five contiguous hunting regions along the central B.C. coast. Together the regions, which stretch from the northern tip of Vancouver Island in the south to Princess Royal Island in the north and cover a land m [no swearing please] of more than 20,000 square kilometres, are home to hundreds of species, including such popular commercial game as grizzlies, black bears, the so-called spirit bear (a genetic anomaly of the black bear that manifests itself in a white coat), wolves, cougar, mountain goats, moose and deer.
But Raincoast, in conjunction with the six first nations that occupy the territory -- the Heiltsuk, Kitasoo, Xai'xais, Wuikinuxv, Gwa'Sala-Nakwaxda'xw and Nuxalk -- intend to put an immediate end to all commercial hunting in the area. That means no one from outside B.C. would be permitted to kill any animals in the region for sport. B.C. residents, who operate under different regulations, may continue to hunt and kill wildlife in the area, but members of the five first nations hope to see an end to that early next year.

The deal will be announced at a press conference in Vancouver later today. The money was raised by the Raincoast Conservation Foundation, fundraising arm of the Raincoast Conservation Society.

According to provincial regulations, licensed guide-outfitters must continue to facilitate some hunting in areas for which they are responsible.

Raincoast conservation director Ian McAllister, who helped broker the deal, said Raincoast will live up to those obligations by allowing hunting of some ungulates -- hoofed grazing animals -- for food.

But henceforth commercial trophy hunting will be a thing of the past.

Raincoast will hold the licence indefinitely although the province will charge an annual fee, which will be negotiated.

"There is no other example in North America where conservation interests have bought out such a large commercial hunting area before," McAllister said.


First nations representatives, who are negotiating a land and resource management plan with Victoria, say they hope the deal will be expanded in early 2006 to include a ban on resident sport hunting as well.

About 40 per cent of all animals killed along the coast are killed by resident hunters.

"First nations don't hunt for trophies," said Heiltsuk chief Ross Wilson. "We kill for need, not desire."

Wilson said he has met with Environment Minister Barry Penner and Agriculture and Lands Minster Pat Bell to put forward his nation's case against trophy hunting. "I think the minister hears us," Wilson said. "What he does might be another story."
Kitasoo band manager Percy Starr was more optimistic. "I'm very much excited about the status of our government-to-government process now," Starr said. "It appears they want to negotiate with us. I know there will be some major changes in our relationship. I'm hopeful that they will support what we want."
 

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This is not a bad thing. Think about it. This 20,000 kilometers is equivalent to 187 square miles. Big area for us Jersey people but small in relation to British Columbia which would cover the eastern US coast. Big game animals need gigantic land areas to survive. Doesn't mean they will never migrate to other areas. The real damage is if this land was to be developed. That would kill all big game animals without anyone aware of what happened.
 

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Ellis is a "Sell Out" The greedy bastard took the money and now will give wildlife tours.

What a greedy jerk!
 

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This is the same outfitter who Tred Barta uses to arrow his record book grizzly.

The land is very rugged, I doubt that they will ever develop it. If you have never been there you could not imagine. They use planes and boats not wheeled vehicles.

Also, we hunters have purchesed our own land MILLIONS OF ACRES. It called the PITTMAN-ROBERTSON ACT. For everyones information we outdoorsmen and women bought every piece of land at least 90%+. Do some research, you will be amaised at what you can find out about us "bad hunters, anglers and trappers".


Ryan

All Rights Reserved. Copyright (c) 2005 Wild Outdoorsmen Media, LLC:):)
 

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Will be a poachers haven. The antis target hunters and don't even probably realise that there's the eliment of poachers among our ranks.Are the antis going to police that area? Yeah sure they will.
 

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I said it in other forum messages, money makes the world go round. Hunter is a collective word made up of many disciplines, where-as anti hunting is a one group idea.

IF we formed 1 organization everyone believed in and supported we could achieve the same results.

Don't be amazed at that purchase, let it be our lesson.
 

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I'm not an expert on the law, least of all Canadian law, but here in the U.S. the GAME belongs to the state, the LAND belongs to the owner.

Under dire circumstances the state (or province) may ("MAY") be able to order the owner to admit hunters to balance populations.

Sorta makes this whole "eminent domain" thing worth thinking about, don't it?
 

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JB,
I don't think I want any government in my business more then they are now.
drome,
Money and a group as one. Here is my findings. I'm also a member to 22 out of the 35 organizations.


http://www.conservationforum.org/nwcp/
In August of 2000, 35 hunting/conservation organizations came together in Missoula, Montana to answer four questions.

Should our organizations build unity and increase collective effectiveness; if so, what are some of the specific ways to do it?
Should our organizations develop a vision for wildlife; if so, what should it contain?
Should our organizations collectively address some key issues; if so, what is the “short list” of issues and how should resolution be accomplished?
Should our organizations develop a wildlife conservation agenda for the next administration and Congress; if so, what should it contain?
During that meeting the assembled organizations said yes to the four questions and made significant progress in putting together the who, what, why and how.

This website is an outgrowth of that meeting and one of the elements identified in answering the first question above. These organizations agreed that they did not need to create a new organization but that by communicating more often and efficiently they would greatly enhance the effectiveness of the work each organization does.

Participating organizations are listed on the Partners page so you can learn more about each organization. In the News Room there is a list of press releases, where you will find current information about the partners and in the Calendar area you will find upcoming events hosted or sponsored by the partners. The News Room and Calendar sections are still under construction, however, sample items are listed.

If you are interested in hunting and conservation you are looking at the best source of information on those organizations that lead the way.

Ryan

All Rights Reserved. Copyrights (c) 2005 Wild Outdoorsmen Media, LLC
 
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