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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't have any money to go out and but one now but I want to start my research. I'm pulling 71# on my compound and trying to figure a good weight for a recurve. I don't know a thing about recurve brands so does anyone have one they recommend? I don't know about you guys but I love how quiet bows are. The arrows being reusable is a huge plus for me.
 

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You're gonna get some crazy advice here I think. What's worked for me has been staying away from factory bows. The shelfs, which most guys shoot off of instinctively are too high. I shoot 70 my compounds yet my 64lb Widow is very tough w my shot shoulders. On a take down though you can get lighter kinds. I've normally shot them in the 60s but have gone up to 75 as a kid. That's stupid don't do that. Also some bows stack more than others and are harder to shoot. I have a Bighorn that's the same weight as the Widow and that I can shoot fairly easy. Some Bear guy'll say the shelf height don't matter but Fred Bear if I'm right cut his down
 

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Don't overbow yourself. 45 lbs is enough to kill anything that walks in North America. Go to a true pro shop and consider taking some lessons with an experienced bowman. Develop good habitats to start and you will enjoy the stick and string!
 

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Don't overbow yourself. 45 lbs is enough to kill anything that walks in North America. Go to a true pro shop and consider taking some lessons with an experienced bowman. Develop good habitats to start and you will enjoy the stick and string!
A lot of pro shops aren't stick bow shops. They couldn't give ya lessons. A traditional shop yes, not many around though
 

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A lot of pro shops aren't stick bow shops. They couldn't give ya lessons. A traditional shop yes, not many around though
Agreed. You gotta do some research. Mike at A&M in Lakewood won some state championshipswith a recurve. Thats a good place to start. Len Cardinale an Olympic coach and National Bowhunting Hall of Famer gives lessons. Can't go wrong with those guys.
 

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Agreed. You gotta do some research. Mike at A&M in Lakewood won some state championshipswith a recurve. Thats a good place to start. Len Cardinale an Olympic coach and National Bowhunting Hall of Famer gives lessons. Can't go wrong with those guys.
Ditto on Len, a class act and a true gentleman of the sport!
 
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samick sage or tradtech pinnacle II w/ tradtech wood glass limbs or two of the best entry level bows that shoot much better than thier price. i would start with a 35# limb regardless of how strong you are even if able to handle much more weight. work on your form, release, and accuracy before going up in weight. i hunt exclusively with a recurve and hunt everything from whitetails to moose. that being said, my hunting bows are 47-54# at my draw length and usually get pass throughs and all animals i hunt. I compete with 38-42# bows. proper broadhead/ arrow selection, tuning, and accuracy is what produce clean kills. you DO NOT need a lot of weight to kill. hunt with a weight that you can shoot comfortably all day long in any situation. the lighter limbs will aid you in producing proper form and shot execution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks guys. To be honest I thought I was shooting 60lbs but when I went to get new arrows cut the guy said it was 71lb. I bought it second hand on Craigslist so I just went by what the guy told me. The bow I learned to shoot on was a recurve. I remember hunting down arrows that missed the target and flew into the woods. I remember there was one I couldn't find and swore up and down I must have hit something since it was gone, lol. Kinda feel old when I think about how that was 13 yrs ago...
 

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I shot 70lb compounds also. My 55lb recurve is a bit to much for me. If you want to stay away from bad habits and bad form, get yourself something in the 45 to 50 pound range. You will thank me later. Mike.
 

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For a first bow ddon't go above 50 lbs even if you're in good shape. 45 is a good weight to start because the act of shooting a recurve requires you to keep pulling thru your back and until you get the form and build the muscles heavy weight will only hinder you. I'm in fairly good shape and shoot a 52 lb Widow. 20 or 25 shots for practice is about my limit until I start to collapse my back and lose form and that requires a few weeks of shooting to build up to after a layoff. If you want to commit get a takedown that you can buy a second set of heavier limbs when you get dialed in. Keep in mind you probably won't be shooting much over 20 yards until your skill level increases and 45 lbs will put an arrow thru a deer at that range.
 

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samick sage or tradtech pinnacle II w/ tradtech wood glass limbs or two of the best entry level bows that shoot much better than thier price. i would start with a 35# limb regardless of how strong you are even if able to handle much more weight. work on your form, release, and accuracy before going up in weight. i hunt exclusively with a recurve and hunt everything from whitetails to moose. that being said, my hunting bows are 47-54# at my draw length and usually get pass throughs and all animals i hunt. I compete with 38-42# bows. proper broadhead/ arrow selection, tuning, and accuracy is what produce clean kills. you DO NOT need a lot of weight to kill. hunt with a weight that you can shoot comfortably all day long in any situation. the lighter limbs will aid you in producing proper form and shot execution.
Couldn't agree more....With traditional archery, shooting form and properly tuned equipment are an absolute must, and unlike a compound, you can't run down to your local bow shop and have a bow tech, tune your bow and sight it in etc.... You have to learn how to do that all on your own. That means tuning the bow for nock point position, brace height, do you need to build up the shooting rail or the shelf etc......., and then matching the bow to the arrow which achieves best flight performance, that's spine, fletching type, length twist, head weight, nock type etc..... There's tons to learn, but it becomes very instinctive as you go....A low draw weight for starting out is an absolute since you need to develop your perfect shooting form...will you shoot three fingers under or split finger, anchor at your chin, or lip etc....cant the bow, or hold verticle...what shooting style will you use, aim point? gap?, instinctive? a combination of two or more of them? you need to learn a smooth release of eth string instead of plucking it....Most importantly, you need to be able to read how the arrow shaft hits the target as the story of what you are doing wrong or right. Shooting a compound is VERY different...... But most importantly, don't be afraid to ask questions if its not working out.....you don't want to have bad practice...practicing bad techniques is worse than no practice at all.
 

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Also it depends on your draw length .I shoot a 61 pound recurve but only draw -27 inch ,so im only pulling about 56-57 pounds .If you pull 29 that would be like a 64 in. bow to you .But 45-55lbs. is a good hunting weight for deer .Dont go too heavy where you might let go the shot too soon.Keep in mind you cant shoot as far as a compound for clean kills .
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I am going to try a lighter weight like you guys said. I've seen a takedown in which the limbs fold into the handle, but that seemed cheaply made to me. Any good brands for a newb? How many of you guys use a release?
 

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Rule of thumb has always been a reduction of 25% when going from compound to stickbow. So, if you are at the low end of 70ish low to mid 50's would put you in the ballpark. As mentioned, a weight of 45 to 55 and arrows with a finished weight of 9 to 11 grains per pound will take anything in this neck of the woods. The biggest key to being a good stickbow shot is to live the sport. Form a habit of shooting a little each day or a few times a week all year long. Traditional archery is addictive because its so much fun.
 

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Any good brands for a newb? How many of you guys use a release?
You Can't go wrong with a Samick Sage...$150 for a nice smooth shooting bow...It's not going to win a beauty contest, but you're not looking at that to start off. As for a release....that's a NO. Shooting traditional is fingers on the string (using a finger tab or shooting glove to reduce finger pinch) either three fingers below the arrow, or split fingers one on top and two below....each person is different, so see what works best for you.
 
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