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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I head to the club property that I belong to, (thanks to this board by the way), for an afternoon hunt. This will be only my second time hunting the property with the first being a day that was above 90 degrees F. My plan is to take a half day from work, get home, retrieve my climbing stand from the property next to my house, cut the gr [no swearing please] (about 1 acre of grass) and then head to the club to hopefully be on stand by 4:00pm.

Well, took a little longer to cut the gr [no swearing please] than I was hoping. And getting 5 miles from the house before realizing that I did not have my bow with me put me in my stand at just about 4:30pm. I am set up off the corner of a large standing corn field about 25 feet up. This is a great spot because there are many trails converging here. The property is boardered by RR tracks, and the deer come across these tracks and down into the woods then into the corn. From my stand height of 25 feet, I could see the tracks as well as the trails coming down from them, so I would be able to see the deer early enough to be ready. Now it is time to wait.

What I don't like about afternoon hunts is this first hour. In the morning, usually the first hour is really busy, typically see deer moving about even if not close to your stand. That first hour of an afternoon hunt when it is warm like this (84 F yesterday) the woods are dead. Hardly and squirels or birds moving let alone deer. But then, usually about 1 hour before sunset, the magic starts. The woods start to come alive, you hear noises (usually the small gray bushey type)and you start to get in the zone.

At 6:20pm, I caught the first sight of them. Slowly moving along the RR tracks. I see two nice doe. One, the lead doe is larger than the trailer. The work their way towards one of the trails that will lead to a great shooting lane from my stand. I slowy stand up and hook my release on the string. Both deer look nervous, but deer usually do when going from one environment to another(this time the open tracks to the wooded area). The lead doe enters the trail first, and moves down the bank. I will have a chance to draw on her in a moment when she is behind the cover of a maple tree, but what I am worried about is the other doe making her way to the trail head. She has a clear view of me and could blow the whole thing! With one eye on the doe I wanted to shoot and the other on the one I don't want busting up this party I pick my moment and slowly draw back my bow. Of course the lead doe stops with only her head sticking out in the shooting lane!!! Seconds feel like minutes. What happens next was that a train came flying down the tracks. This pushed the other doe to move down the trail and finally, my doe takes that last step forward and I release! She jumps and hunches a little and runs off towards the corn. The other doe quickly follows her. I take a deep breath and sit down. I check my watch. 6:40 pm.

15 minutes later, I climb down and look for my arrow.



The arrow is covered with blood! Nice sweet smell, and is about 4 inches in the ground.

I call my wife and tell her I am going to be later getting home tonight. Stash my climber and give it a little more time. At 7:15, I begin looking for the blood trail. Not too much, but some. I head towards the corn field hoping that she did not make it into the corn. No such luck:


Now I am a little worried, the blood is dark, and really not that much. Could I have had a bad hit? I know it was not a gut shot because the arrow had no evidence of this. Maybe liver? The hunching of the doe after the shot makes me think maybe. I move forward and the blood gets a little better.


Ok, so now I am feeling a little better, may be it is taking a little time for her body to fill with blood. Plus, and am only 20 yards from where she was hit. Then the trail leads me to this...


So the hit is good, getting good blood now. Also seeing a lot up on the corn stalks like this...


A little more and I find her...


This is the entrance side. A touch further back than I would have liked, but still a really good hit. Overall, she probably ran 50-60 yards.

Here is the exit wound from the spitfire...



As seen by the exit, she was slightly quarting towards me (which she wasn't until she steped into the shooting lane. While dressing her, I got one lung, liver and heart.


Thanks for reading....:D

-dan
 

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Great job Dan nice recount of the hunt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys!
 

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great job Dan![up]
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks guys, forgot to mention that the shot was 19 yards.

-dan
 

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Good job Dan! Really like the way you have pics of everything too....Its almost like we were there trailing her with you.[up]

Congrats![up]
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I would have done a better job with pictures, but it was pretty dark and my camera batteries were going dead.

-dan
 

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Awesome story. And the pics were basically perfect. It gave me a great idea of exactly how the hunt/trailing went. Nice!

David
 
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